Empowering students to learn & lead

Echo

  • March 3Spring Break! March 20-24

  • March 3Town & Country Chamber of Commerce luncheon, March 15

  • March 3Parent Coffee this Thursday, March 9 (Youth Room)

Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

Students+will+make+pinhole+cameras+to+view+the+solar+eclipse+in+August.
Students will make pinhole cameras to view the solar eclipse in August.

Students will make pinhole cameras to view the solar eclipse in August.

Students will make pinhole cameras to view the solar eclipse in August.

Story and captions by Jake Wilson, Reporter

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






On Monday, August 21, Miriam Academy students will do something that no human being has done in this area since before Columbus sailed to America. With pinhole cameras in hand, students will march up to the big field and watch the biggest event in St. Louis: the great american solar eclipse.

“I’ve never seen a solar eclipse before,” said Miriam Academy student Nick Lewis. “It’s going to be so exciting to see it with my homemade pinhole camera.”

Pinhole cameras are really easy to make and are very good at protecting your eyes from the sun. Remember when, as a kid, you used to burn holes in things with a magnifying glass? The same kind of lens is in your eye. When you look at the sun, that lens in your eye will fry your retina, effectively making you blind.

A pinhole camera can be made from an long box, a piece of tracing paper, some aluminum from a can, and a pushpin. First, cut both of the small ends off the box. One will be for the tracing paper, which will act as a screen, the other will be where the pinhole is. Next, cut just the top and bottom of the can off, so it leaves a large cylinder. Then cut a line straight down one side of the can so you have a rectangle of aluminum. Then tape the aluminum on top of the open side of the box. Then, push the pushpin into the aluminum in the middle and remove the pin. Then cover up all of the gaps(if you have any) and voila! Your very own pinhole camera!

To operate, aim the pinhole directly at the eclipsing sun until you see it on the tracing paper. You may need to block out extra light out from around the screen.This is a great way to view a solar eclipse. Again, never look directly at the sun.

“I can’t wait for this event,” said Mr. Holmes. “It’s not often you get to see something in your hometown that hasn’t occurred for centuries.”

He’s right, a solar eclipse hasn’t happened in St. Louis for 575 years. That means that the last one happened in 1442, 50 years before Columbus sailed to America. That doesn’t mean that eclipses are rare. A total solar eclipse happens about every 18 months. But, to view these, you have to be in a very specific location. That’s why this eclipse is so rare for St. Louisans. It begins at 11:50 a.m., but will be best viewed around 1:18 p.m. It ends at 2:44 p.m.

Print Friendly, PDF & Email

1 Comment

One Response to “Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August”

  1. Linda Chamberlin on February 27th, 2017 12:43 am

    Great article! This was informative and I now know how to have a pin hole camera ready for the eclipse.
    Thanks!

    [Reply]

If you want a picture to show with your comment, go get a gravatar.




Navigate Right
Navigate Left
  • Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

    Showcase

    Students explore technical college

  • Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

    Showcase

    Backup plan proves successful on Washington, Missouri field trip

  • Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

    Showcase

    Robotics to start in March

  • Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

    Sports

    Spring training begins for Miriam Academy

  • Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

    Showcase

    Students explore technical college

  • Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

    Showcase

    Backup plan proves successful on Washington, Missouri field trip

  • Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

    News

    Teens can be victims of cyber attacks

  • Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

    A&E

    Not all rap deserves a bad rap

  • Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

    Student Life

    Students plan trivia night fundraiser

  • Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August

    News

    Bullying remains a serious problem at many high schools

Empowering students to learn & lead
Students to build pinhole cameras to view solar eclipse in August