State park visit enahnces lessons

On+October+12%2C+2016%2C+Nick+Lewis+and+Jacob+Wiley+look+at+a+reconstructed++mastodon+made+up+of+bones+found+outside+of+Kimmswick%2C+Missouri.+This+was+a+very+fun+field+trip+for+Miriam+Academy%2C+especially+for+Nick+and+Jacob.+%28Caption+by+Henry+Lohmann%29
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State park visit enahnces lessons

On October 12, 2016, Nick Lewis and Jacob Wiley look at a reconstructed  mastodon made up of bones found outside of Kimmswick, Missouri. This was a very fun field trip for Miriam Academy, especially for Nick and Jacob. (Caption by Henry Lohmann)

On October 12, 2016, Nick Lewis and Jacob Wiley look at a reconstructed mastodon made up of bones found outside of Kimmswick, Missouri. This was a very fun field trip for Miriam Academy, especially for Nick and Jacob. (Caption by Henry Lohmann)

On October 12, 2016, Nick Lewis and Jacob Wiley look at a reconstructed mastodon made up of bones found outside of Kimmswick, Missouri. This was a very fun field trip for Miriam Academy, especially for Nick and Jacob. (Caption by Henry Lohmann)

On October 12, 2016, Nick Lewis and Jacob Wiley look at a reconstructed mastodon made up of bones found outside of Kimmswick, Missouri. This was a very fun field trip for Miriam Academy, especially for Nick and Jacob. (Caption by Henry Lohmann)

Story and captions by Henry Lohmann, Reporter

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Mastodon State Park employee Brooke Mahar shows students of Miriam Academy the Atl’Atl, which was the most useful weapon that the Clovis people used. Most scientists believe that the Clovis people were the first inhabitants of the Americas. (Caption by Henry Lohmann)

On October 12, 2016, students and teachers of Miriam Academy took a field trip to Mastodon State Park. This field trip was set up by Mrs. Brothers to help us learn more about mastodons and the Clovis people. Students were interested in all kinds of things, from the movie to the exhibits.

“I thought it was interesting learning about the animals that the Clovis people hunted,” said Jack Hereford. “I thought that Mastodon State Park was really interesting.” Some students and teachers are interested in similar things.

The coolest part about the park for me is that prehistoric stuff is in the ground there,” said Mr. Holmes.

It is important to know about Mastodons and Clovis people co-existing in the area because it’s a large part of our history here in Missouri and North America. The interactions between humans and animals effects our environment. For example, too much hunting of a particular species could lead to extinction and not enough hunting could lead to overpopulation and crowding. The Clovis people relied on the Mastodons to survive and it was an important part of their survival.

The atl’atl was a very important weapon for the Clovis people. It ensured their survival during the Ice Age by allowing them to hunt the mega fauna. It was so widely distributed and used during prehistoric north America, in fact, groups used it until the invention of the bow and arrows. Even with the invention of the bow and arrow, the technology didn’t die and groups all over the world still use an atl’atl to hunt. That is a tough question and hard to say. Unfortunately, it is hard to know about all archaeological excavations and research occurring around the world. I think that as long as people are interested in discovering our past there will always be exciting new discoveries. Said Brooke Mahar

It is important to know that people were hunting mastodons in North America 13,000 years ago, as there are no written records or any kind of recorded history that goes that far back in time. It is incredible to think that people ounce hunted these elephants, and may have played a roll in the extinction of elephants in North America.

The projectile points the Clovis hunters made is one of the only artifacts that are preserved in the archaeological record. The points are flaked out of stone that does not rot away. Leather, wood and other perishable items do not last long in the ground. The Clovis points are very distinct, and easy to recognize by archaeologists. The people that made them struck two basil thinning flakes up the bases of the points so they would fit into the hafts of the spears. Clovis points are also quite large for himg_5629psdunting the large animals that lived in North America at that time.

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Sam Cordes reads about the different Clovis points that these early inhabitants used. He was very interested in the Clovis points and other exhibits at Mastodon State Park. (Caption by Henry Lohmann)

The next big discovery’s will be sites that are much older than Clovis. We now have a smattering of sites that have Pre clovis artifacts. It is likely in the next 10 to 20 years we will push back human occupation in North America to at least 20 to 30 thousand years or more. We are continually learning new things, and changing our theories about the past.

Said Allen Denoyer

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